Comprehensive Roof Inspection

Certification and Inspection Association Business Member’s Guide

 

Comprehensive roof inspections are an essential part of maintaining a safe and functional building. A roof is often taken for granted until a problem arises. Regular inspections by a certified roofing contractor help to prevent any potential issues from becoming major problems.

 

The consequences of a leaky or damaged roof can be severe and can lead to costly repairs for both the building owner and occupants if not properly addressed in a timely manner. As a business member of the National Roofing Certification and Inspection Association (NRCIA), providing your clients with the best possible service to protect their properties is crucial.

 

Orange County Roof Inspection
Roof Inspection

Section 1: The Importance of Regular Roof Inspection: Preventative Maintenance for Roofing Integrity

 

1.1 Early Detection of Issues

 

Early detection of potential issues is crucial in maintaining the functionality and safety of your building’s roof. A proper roof inspection by a certified roofing company can detect any signs of wear and tear early on, allowing for appropriate remediation measures to be taken before more significant problems arise.

 

During a comprehensive roof inspection, the inspector will assess the roof’s overall condition, taking measurements such as slope, water spots, cracks, and leaks, and checking for any damage from wind or hail. They will also check for any potential issues related to gutters, downspouts vent pipes, and roof drainage patterns, ensuring that water is directed away from the roof and building.

 

Early detection and repair of issues such as damaged shingles, cracks, tears, or other weaknesses that may result from weather, fallen debris, or even simple aging can save time and money in the long run. It permits remediation before more significant problems arise, potentially averting the need for an entirely new roof. Furthermore, early detection can help to identify potential safety concerns, such as the presence of overhanging branches or any other potential structural issues. Addressing these concerns early can help ensure the safety of the building’s occupants.

 

Early detection of potential issues during a roof inspection is critical in maintaining the functionality and safety of your building’s roof. Detecting any signs of wear and tear early on during a structural inspection allows for appropriate remediation measures to be taken, potentially averting the need for an entirely new roof. It also helps identify potential safety concerns and ensures the safety of the building’s occupants.

 

1.2 Maximizing Roof’s Lifespan

 

Comprehensive Roof Inspection
Comprehensive Roof Inspection

 

Regular inspections are essential in maximizing the lifespan of your building’s roof. By detecting any signs of wear and tear early on, appropriate remediation measures can be taken, preventing further damage, and extending the roof’s lifespan.

 

Additionally, regular inspections can provide a better understanding of the roof’s lifespan, allowing for proper planning and budgeting for the eventual need for a new roof. By knowing when to replace the roof, building owners can avoid costly emergency roof repairs, and ensure that their roofing investment lasts as long as possible.

 

Regular comprehensive roof inspections can also increase confidence and peace of mind, knowing that the roof is in good condition and that appropriate measures are being taken to ensure its longevity. It also provides a safer and more secure building environment, ensuring that any potential safety concerns are identified and addressed promptly.

 

Moreover, regular inspections by a professional roofing company that can certify a leak-free roof, can help to identify any potential energy efficiency issues, such as improper insulation, which can increase heating and cooling costs. By identifying these issues early on, appropriate remediation measures can be taken, reducing energy costs and improving the building’s overall efficiency.

 

Regular inspections by a roofing professional are essential in maximizing the lifespan of your building’s roof. It allows for appropriate remediation measures to be taken, preventing further damage and extending the roof’s lifespan. It also provides a better understanding of the roof’s lifespan, ensuring proper planning and budgeting.

 

Regular inspections increase confidence and peace of mind, provide a safer and more secure building environment, and identify potential energy efficiency issues, reducing energy costs and improving the building’s overall efficiency.

 

Section 2: Thorough Assessment Techniques for Identifying Potential Roofing Issues

 

2.1 Comprehensive Inspection Techniques

 

Comprehensive roof inspections are critical in identifying potential roofing issues. It is essential to take measurements such as slope, water spots, cracks, and leaks, as well as assess the roof’s overall condition. These techniques can help identify potential roof damage issues before they become major problems, leading to costly repairs or complete roof replacements.

 

When it comes to assessing the roof’s condition, it is vital to take note of any discoloration, missing shingles, or any other signs of wear and tear. A thorough inspection of the roof’s surface can also identify any rusted or corroded flashings, which can cause leaks and structural damage over time. The inspector should also look for any visible signs of damage, such as cracks or dents in the roof, which may indicate a potential weakness.

 

During the roof inspection process, it is essential to check the new roof for any damage from wind or hail. Wind damage can cause shingles or other roofing materials to lift, exposing the roof to potential leaks and water damage. Hail damage can result in cracked or dented shingles, leading to further damage and potentially requiring complete roof replacement.

 

It is also important to inspect the gutters, downspouts, and roof drainage patterns. Clogged gutters can redirect water into unexpected areas, leading to mold, leaks, pests, water stains, and even structural damage. Proper drainage is essential to ensure that water is directed away from the roof and building. Roof inspectors may also assess the condition of your roof’s insulation to ensure it meets current standards, which can improve energy efficiency and reduce heating and cooling costs.

 

Lastly, inspectors may assess for any tree growth near the roof or any other potential issues that could cause structural problems. Overhanging branches can cause significant damage to the roof, leading to leaks and other issues. Any potential mold growth or structural issues should be identified and addressed to ensure the safety of the building’s occupants.

 

Professional inspections, by a reputable roofing contractor, are essential in identifying potential roofing issues before they become major problems. By assessing the roof’s overall condition, taking measurements such as slope, water spots, cracks, and leaks, and checking for any damage from wind or hail, roof inspectors can identify potential weaknesses and recommend appropriate remediation measures and sound roofing advice.

 

Additionally, inspecting the gutters, downspouts, and roof drainage patterns and assessing any potential structural issues can help ensure the safety and longevity of the roofing investment.

 

2.2 Importance of Gutters, Downspouts, and Drainage Patterns

 

During the roof inspection process, it is important to assess the gutters, downspouts, and roof drainage patterns as well. Cleaning gutters and downspouts is essential to ensuring water is directed away from the roof and building.

 

Roof inspectors may also look at the roof’s insulation to ensure it meets current standards, which can improve energy efficiency and reduce heating and cooling costs. Lastly, inspectors may assess the house for any tree growth near the roof or any other potential issues that could cause structural problems.

 

Section 3: Benefits of Hiring a Certified Roofing Contractor: Ensuring Quality Construction and Peace of Mind

 

3.1 Thorough and Experienced Inspection

 

When it comes to roof and home inspections though, hiring a certified roofing company is crucial in ensuring that the job is done thoroughly and professionally. A certified roofing inspector is an experienced and trained professional who can identify potential issues that an inexperienced or uncertified inspector may miss.

 

During the inspection process, the certified inspector will carry out a thorough assessment of the roof’s overall condition, taking measurements such as slope, water spots, cracks, and leaks, and checking for any damage from wind or hail. Additionally, the inspector will check the gutters, downspouts, and roof drainage patterns to ensure proper water flows away from the building. Any potential structural issues or overhanging branches that could cause damage to the roof will also be inspected and assessed.

 

The inspector’s experience and expertise will enable them to identify potential weaknesses and recommend appropriate remediation measures. They can also provide recommendations to help extend the roof’s lifespan, such as proper maintenance and cleaning techniques.

 

In addition to identifying potential issues, a professional roofer can fix any problems quickly and efficiently. They have the necessary tools and knowledge to carry out any repairs required, ensuring that the job is done to industry standards.

 

By hiring a certified roofing professional, you can have peace of mind knowing that your roofing investment is in good hands. A roofing professional carried out by an experienced and trained professional will help ensure the safety and longevity of the roof, maximizing its lifespan and reducing the likelihood of an expensive roof problem & roofing repairs down the road.

 

Roof inspections by a certified inspector are essential in ensuring a thorough and professional roof inspection. With their experience and expertise, they can identify potential issues and recommend appropriate replacement options, roof repairs, and remediation measures, ensuring the safety and longevity of the roofing investment. Additionally, they can fix any problem quickly and efficiently, reducing the likelihood of costly repairs down the road.

 

3.2 Safety and Longevity of Roofing Investment

 

Hiring an experienced and certified roof company for a roof inspection is essential for the safety and longevity of your roofing investment. While it may be tempting to cut costs and hire an inexperienced or uncertified inspector, doing so can lead to significant risks down the road.

 

An uncertified inspector performing a roof inspection may miss critical issues during the inspection process, leading to costly repairs or even complete roof replacements down the road. Their lack of experience and expertise can result in overlooking potential safety concerns or issues related to building code compliance.

 

Additionally, an uncertified inspector may not have the necessary tools or knowledge to carry out any repairs required efficiently and effectively, leading to further damage to the roof and potentially putting the building’s occupants at risk.

 

By contrast, a certified roof inspector has the necessary expertise and experience to identify potential issues and recommend appropriate remediation measures. They are knowledgeable about industry standards and regulations, ensuring that the job is done to the appropriate level of quality.

 

Hiring a certified roof inspector can also provide peace of mind, knowing that your roofing investment is in good hands. They can provide recommendations to help extend the roof’s lifespan, such as proper maintenance and cleaning techniques, reducing the likelihood of costly repairs down the road.

 

The safety and longevity of your roofing investment are crucial. Hiring an experienced and certified roof inspector is essential in ensuring that the job is done thoroughly and professionally. An uncertified inspector may miss critical issues, leading to costly repairs or even complete roof replacements down the road.

 

By contrast, a certified roof inspector can identify potential issues, recommend appropriate remediation measures, and provide peace of mind, ensuring the safety and longevity of the roofing investment.

 

3.3 Adherence to Industry Standards

 

Certified roof inspectors pay close attention to current roofing industry standards, ensuring that the job is carried out to the appropriate level of quality. They have the necessary certification examinations, training, and continuing education to carry out a thorough inspection and make appropriate recommendations.

 

As such, certified inspectors have extensive experience with all types of roofing materials, allowing them to identify potential issues and recommend appropriate remediation measures. They know what to look for and what methods to use when assessing different materials, ensuring that the job is done to industry standards.

 

Additionally, certified inspectors are knowledgeable about building codes and regulations, ensuring that the roof’s installation and maintenance comply with appropriate standards. Compliance with industry standards is essential in ensuring the safety and longevity of the roofing investment.

 

Hiring a certified roofer for an annual inspection, provides peace of mind, knowing that the job is being carried out to the appropriate level of quality. The inspector’s adherence to industry standards ensures that any potential issues are identified, and appropriate remediation measures are taken, reducing the likelihood of costly repairs down the road.

 

Certified roof inspectors are trained professionals who pay close attention to current roofing industry standards. They have extensive experience with all types of roofing materials, allowing them to identify potential issues and recommend appropriate remediation measures. Their adherence to industry standards ensures that the job is carried out to the appropriate level of quality, ensuring the safety and longevity of the roofing investment.

 

3.4 Confidence and Peace of Mind

 

Hiring a certified roof inspector brings certain confidence and peace of mind that anyone needs when making a significant roofing investment. Roofers’ associations generally stand by certified roofers, ensuring that they adhere to proper protocols and quality construction. Besides, a certified roof inspector can provide useful tips for maintaining the roof effectively, thus avoiding costly repairs in the future.

 

As a business member of the NRCIA, providing your clients with the best possible service to protect their properties is crucial. Regular roof inspections can detect potential issues before they become major problems, maximizing the roof’s lifespan, and ensuring a safer and more secure building environment.

 

Comprehensive roof inspection techniques and assessment of the gutters, downspouts, and drainage patterns are essential in identifying potential roofing problems. Hiring a certified inspector for your roof brings the confidence and peace of mind that comes with a thorough and experienced inspection, adherence to industry standards, and useful tips for maintaining the roof effectively. Avoiding risks in terms of the safety and longevity of the roofing investment is vital for anyone looking to protect their properties.

What happens when a LeakFREE® Certified Roof has a leak?

LeakFREE® Roof Certifications provide property owners an assurance that their roof will remain leak-free for the duration of their certification period. But what happens if a leak does occur during that period?

We are going to follow a recent example provided by an NRCIA Inspector. Below we will break down the steps the property owner took from the start of the certification to fixing the leak.

Receive a LeakFREE® Roof Certification

Over a year ago, a property owner contacted an NRCIA inspector requesting an inspection and roof certification. An NRCIA Certified Inspector then completed a LeakFREE® Roof Inspection, during which the Inspector highlighted several repairs required before the roof could be certified.

The property owner completed the repairs, and upon re-inspection of the repairs, the Inspector issued a LeakFREE® Roof Certification. With roof assurances in place, the homeowner was ready for whatever the future may hold.

Active Leak Found in a LeakFREE® Roof

Recently, the property owner found an active roof leak. The roof is still within the certification period. They contacted the NRCIA Inspector that issued the LeakFREE® Certification and requested a diagnostic inspection. Diagnostic inspections are for certificate holders, and they entail a 3-zone inspection process to determine if the damage is covered by the certification.

In this case, the damage was covered by the roof certification. Specifically, there was a leak from damaged underlayment at a valley location. The damaged underlayment could have been identified and repaired during the first initial inspection (before issuing a certificate) but was missed by the inspector.

Damage Covered by Certification

Since the damage is covered by the LeakFREE® Roof Certification, the inspection fee and repair fees were waived for the property owner. Certifications will have different monetary limits of liability depending upon the roof system and other factors. The limits-of-liability outline the maximum monetary amount of damages covered by the issuing Inspector.

The NRCIA Inspector then worked with the property owner to outline the repair plan. After the repairs were completed, the certification will continue until the end of the period. After that period, re-certification is possible after re-inspection. This cycle helps set up a great roof care plan for property owners.

Click Image to Learn More About LeakFREE® Certifications

Roof Assurance

When trouble did arise, the homeowner had no out-of-pocket expenses to repair this unforeseen issue. Trusting your roofing professionals and the organization that stands behind the inspection process is essential for every property owner.

In summary, this property owner saved money, time, and stress by originally contacting an NRCIA Inspector. NRCIA Inspectors are the only inspectors authorized to complete LeakFREE® Roof Inspections & issue LeakFREE® Roof Certifications.

Drones, Licensing, and Knowing Your Airspace

Author: Jon Stivers

Jon is an Internachi certified home inspector, and the owner of Top Inspections LLC, in Philadelphia, Pa. He holds a part 107 commercial drone license and flies a DJI Mavic Air 2. The company website is https://topinspectionsllc.com


It is becoming much more common for drones to be used for roof and exterior inspections. Drone images can provide a great overall picture of the roof. With a skilled pilot, it is also possible to get in close for detail shots. Drones are especially helpful if the roof is inaccessible due to height, steepness, roof covering material, or poor condition. Some inspectors use a drone for all roof inspections that do not have safe, permanent access. Drone inspections save time and reduce liability. While drone roof inspections cannot completely replace walking the roof when it is safe and appropriate, they are an important tool for an inspector to consider.

The photo below shows a drone photo of a roof and exterior (See Figure 1: Obliquangle drone photograph). The overhead point of view allows the inspector to evaluate many aspects of the roof and exterior in one shot, and get an impression of the overall condition of the outside of the building. For example, in this photo the metal gutters and flashing look worn and corroded, and show evidence of piecemeal repairs. Several slate shingles have been replaced. The bay roof peaks have received a last resort repair using roofing cement. The stone walls show evidence of chronic water management problems. By contrast, the bay windows and scalloped siding appear to be in very good condition.

Figure 1: Oblique angle drone photograph.

The photo allows the inspector to conclude that the house roof and exterior has received some localized patching and repairs of various quality, but overall needs to be thoroughly renovated.

There are lots of drones on the market that home inspectors can choose from. Prosumer models feature cameras with resolutions comparable to a high-quality phone. Higher end models have larger photo sensors, zoom lenses, and can include infrared capability. There is plenty of information available for selecting a drone and learning to fly. Beyond that, it is important to fly legally and safely while doing inspections. The purpose of this article is to provide a simple introduction to legal and safe commercial drone operation.

Getting Your Pilot Certificate

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requires commercial operators to fly by the rules of Part 107 for small unmanned aircraft systems. To summarize the rules as they apply to home inspection, a Part 107 drone “license” is required if compensation is received for use of the drone images. This includes images in a paid inspection report. For perspective on this federal law, note that posting drone footage on YouTube to promote a business is also considered commercial use. Suffice it to say that home inspectors will need a Part 107 Pilot’s Certificate.

The first step to getting a Part 107 certificate is to create a personal profile with the FAA. This can be done at https://iacra.faa.gov/IACRA/. The FAA calls this profile the Integrated Airman Certification and Rating Application. The purpose of the profile is to create a digital folder to contain any pilot ratings and aircraft registrations associated with the drone pilot. The FAA will run a background check as part of creating the profile. It is important to note that when the application is approved a unique FAA Tracking Number (FTN) will be assigned to the personal profile. This number will follow the pilot throughout his career. Be sure to write down this number. It will be needed when registering for the exam.

After getting signed up with the FAA, it is time to study for the Part 107 exam. As per the FAA, the exam topics include:

  • Applicable regulations relating to small unmanned aircraft system rating privileges, limitations, and flight operation
  • Airspace classification and operating requirements, and flight restrictions affecting small unmanned aircraft operation.
  • Aviation weather sources and effects of weather on small unmanned aircraft performance
  • Small unmanned aircraft loading and performance
  • Emergency procedures
  • Crew resource management
  • Radio communication procedures
  • Determining the performance of small unmanned aircraft
  • Physiological effects of drugs and alcohol
  • Aeronautical decision-making and judgment
  • Airport operations
  • Maintenance and preflight inspection procedures
  • Operation at night

There are many companies that charge for Part 107 training classes, both in person and online. A typical class costs $150.00. Some people pass the test by watching free YouTube videos. Another good option is to get a review book. The author favors a book called, The Remote Pilot Test Prep 2021, by ASA Test Prep. The FAA publishes a book that is used in conjunction with the ASA book. It is called, FAA-CT-8080-2H Airman Knowledge Testing Supplement for Sport Pilot, Recreational Pilot, Remote Pilot, and Private Pilot.

The key to the ASA book approach is the quizzes at the end of each chapter and the online access to 5 free practice tests that are available with the purchase of the book. The questions and answers on the chapter quizzes and the online tests are very similar to the actual Part 107 exam. The aviation maps, charts and tables in the FAA Airman Knowledge Testing Supplement are nearly identical to those that appear on the real exam.

When working through the ASA test prep book, make sure to understand and review all quiz questions that are missed, and the topics from which the questions are drawn. Make sure to understand all the quiz questions and answers before taking a practice exam. Then take one practice exam and review the missed questions in the same way as the quizzes. Keep reviewing and taking quizzes and then keep taking the exams until a solid passing score is achieved. Once you’re comfortable with the practice exams, it is time to take the real exam.

The test must be scheduled in advance and taken in person. The FAA provides a list of test centers. The fee is $175 for every test attempt. The exam is two hours long, and there are 60 questions. The test results appear in the student’s IACRA file about 48 hours after the exam.

Once the exam results are in the IACRA file, there is one more step to achieving the drone pilot certification. Within the IACRA profile, an application for the Part 107 certification must be submitted to the FAA. Even though the test has been passed, it is still necessary to apply for the certification. If that seems confusing, it is. Just remember the steps: Set up the IACRA profile.

Note the FTN number. Make sure to enter the same FTN number when signing up to take the Part 107 exam. The results of the exam will appear in the IACRA folder a few days later.

Use the exam results to make an application within the IACRA profile, for the Part 107 certification. Once that is completed, a temporary certificate is available online to print out. The permanent airman card showing the Part 107 certification will be mailed to you within a few weeks. Remember that proof of certification needs to be carried with you during all drone operations. By virtue of preparation for and passing the exam, the Part 107 certificate holder understands how to fly safely and legally. The following highlights and introduces some important points, but is by no means a complete explanation.

Rules for Flying

The basic limitations are that a drone must be operated during the day, always in a visual line of sight, and no higher than 400 feet above the ground. The limitations apply in uncontrolled as well as controlled airspace. In uncontrolled airspace, there is either no need for Air Traffic Control (ATC), or it is not practical. The Part 107 remote pilot is expected to fly by the rules anyway.

But in controlled airspace that is usually found around airports and densely populated areas, it is necessary for the part 107 pilot to request authorization from ATC.

Authorization may include additional limitations on altitude and other aspects of drone flight. There are many caveats to these rules. For example, uncontrolled airspace can be temporarily controlled or restricted due to a public event, such as a football game, or the presence of VIPs. The remote pilot finds out about these exceptions by reading the Notices to Airmen (NOTAMS) that are available online.

Inspectors that perform roof inspections in urban and suburban environments often find themselves in controlled airspace. One look at an aviation chart will show how complicated navigating in controlled airspace can be (See Figure 2: Aviation Sectional of Southern Los Angeles, CA). Since the drone pilot is flying in a very localized area and at an altitude safely below manned aircraft, things are a little simpler.

Figure 2: Aviation Sectional of Southern Los Angeles, CA
Figure 3: Grid from Airmap.com showing maximum altitude

To make things easier for commercial drone pilots, the FAA has partnered with some online sites that provide ATC authorization in near real-time. The system is called the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC). Airmap.com and KittyHawk.io are two websites that will display ATC authorization in real-time. Applying for authorization is almost as simple as placing a pin on a digital map. For each flight, the pilot logs the location, date, and time of the desired flight, the drone that will be used, the altitude and the duration of the flight. Figure 3 shows a screenshot from Airmap.com. Outside the blue circle is uncontrolled air space. The red dots indicate restricted airspace. (See Figure 3: Grid from Airmap.com showing maximum altitude).

Under normal circumstances, the authorization from ATC will come back in a few minutes. Authorization comes with some notes about the flight, relevant Notices to Airmen (NOTAMS), and a brief weather report for the time and location of the flight. It is a good idea to book the flight at least the day before in case there is an issue. For example, if the inspection site is very close to an airport or in a restricted area, the allowed altitude may be reduced to 0. It is good to know that sooner than a few hours before the inspection.

Hopefully, this article has presented a useful introduction to getting a Part 107 license and flying in a controlled airspace. There is a lot more to learn about safe commercial drone flying. The first step is to get an FAA IACRA profile set up. The next is to study for and pass the Part 107 exam. Then, use the results of the Part 107 exam to apply for certification within the IACRA profile. Finally, use LAANC for rapid ATC flight authorization.

NRCIA Members get a discount on education services provided by Drone Pilot Ground School. Sign in and visit the member portal for more information.

Mr. RoofCheck®’s Advice For Buckling Shingles

Sarah from IL asked:

 

We just had a roof installed this past November and having problems with shingles buckling.

 

Getting the contractor to make the repairs has been very difficult and we ended up having a home inspection performed due to the company placing blame on our ventilation.  The report showed no issues with the attic.  The shingles were installed on wet underlayment due to rain.

 

The company’s solution is to now have a repairman come and cut off the excess part of the buckled shingles and nail the same shingles back down, without replacing the underlayment or replacing the shingles.  Is this an appropriate repair?  It just doesn’t sound right to me.  I have included some photos of the issue.

 


Photos from Home Inspector’s report (click “>” to view photos)

 


 

Mr. RoofCheck®’s advice:

 

After reviewing your file, I wanted to point out a couple of things and hopefully, it will give you a little more information to leverage.

 

First of all, as you indicated this is a GAF Product and although I am not sure about the exact line of shingle, I have included an installation brochure for GAF products. Pages 137-149 specifically talk about the fastening of the shingles which I believe is the deficiency causing the lifting shingles. Here is a link to a GAF video on the installation as well. This will help understand the proper way to install the roofing material.

 

The visible issue that is concerning is the lifting shingles which is why you are reaching out.

 

 

Based on the report you provided, it doesn’t appear that the fasteners that were used were long enough to penetrate through the wood substrate.

 

The reason why this is important is that if the mechanical fasteners do not penetrate through the roof sheathing, then as the building materials expand and contract due to weather fluctuations, it will draw the mechanical fasteners back up through the roofing material causing the shingles to lift.

 

I believe improper mechanical fasteners may be the cause of the roof deficiency. With that said, if the shingles were not installed per manufacturer specifications, the manufacturer warranty may be void. As far as the proposed repair methodology, if the wrong mechanical fasteners were used to install the roofing material, the shingles will continue to buckle throughout the roofing material. Unfortunately, a complete roof replacement may be the only option.

 

 

How to become an NRCIA Certified Roof Inspector

Earning your certification is a straightforward process. Complete our training, conduct a practice inspection, and meet with an Instructor.

 

The full onboarding process generally takes about 2 – 4 weeks depending on your schedule. Onboarding is fully online, so you can earn your certification on your time. To learn more about the education program, visit: https://www.nrcia.org/nrcia-membership/education-training/

 

Below is an onboarding checklist for new inspectors. Please note that NRCIA Affiliates do not complete the same onboarding process. Feel free to download the checklist and share with your team!

 

 

Have questions? Send us a message at memberships@nrcia.org to contact an NRCIA representative or schedule a demo.

 

 

ROI for NRCIA Inspectors

Return on Investment (ROI) is the annual return you receive on an investment, displayed as a percentage. For example, if the bank is offering a 5% interest rate, then you intuitively know a deposit of $100 today will return an additional $5 a year from now, making the ROI 5%.  

 

Payback Period is nothing more than time needed before you recover your investment. Let’s go back to our $100 investment, but make the annual return $50 (or a 50% ROI). If you receive $50 every year, it will take two years to recover your $100 investment, making your Payback Period two years.  

 

ROI and Payback Period Calculator

 

Below is a calculator that will help you understand the potential revenue by adding NRCIA inspections to your services offered for clients.  

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NRCIA Domains

NRCIA owns several dozen domains that will guide homeowners and your other end-users in their search to NRCIA services and, ultimately, to you. Here is a partial list of NRCIA domains that could directly benefit your sales funnel via leads.

aboutroofinspection.com

aboutroofinspections.com

buyers-roof-inspection.com

buyers-roof-inspections.com

buyersroofinspection.com

fharoofinspection.com

forensicroof.com

forensicroof.info

forensicroofinspector.com

forensicroofinspector.org

gotleaks.com

gotleaks.us

ircia.org

leakfree-warranties.info

leakfree.ca

leakfree.mobi

leakfreeroofcertification.com

leakfreeroofs.com

leakfreeroofwarranty.com

leakfreeroofwarranty.info

leakfreeroofwarranty.net

leakfreewarranty.com

leakfreewarranty.mobi

leakfreewarranty.net

mrroofcheck.com

roof-certification.com

roof-certification.mobi

roof-inspection.com

roof-inspection.mobi

roof-warranty.mobi

roofcertification.biz

roofcertification.com

roofcertification.mobi

roofcertification.net

roofcertification.org

roofcertifications.biz

roofcertifications.org